• Did You Know? Just one soda or juice drink can have as much sugar as two candy bars (on average, based on a 20 fl oz portion size). Replace sugary drinks with water. Your text comes here
  • Did You Know? Children who are overweight as adolescents have a 70% chance of becoming overweight or obese adults. When it comes to what they drink, less sugar equals better health. Your text comes here
  • Did You Know? Sugary drinks are the largest source of added sugar in the American diet. Your kids are already sweet. Don't add sugar. Just add water. Your text comes here
  • Did You Know? Be a water role model. We all know kids pick up habits from mom and dad. When your kids see you drinking water they are more likely to drink water too! Your text comes here
  • Did You Know? Keep sugary drinks out of the fridge and out of your house. What happens at home sets the tone for what happens everywhere else. Your text comes here
  • Did You Know? According to the CDC, obese children and adolescents have a greater risk of social and psychological problems, such as discrimination and poor self-esteem, which can continue into adulthood. Replace sugary drinks with water. Your text comes here
  • The JUST ADD WATER public health intervention has received the official endorsement of the Kansas Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Your text comes here

    Frequently Asked Questions

  • What is a sugary drink?
  • A sugary drink is a drink that's high in added sugar and calories and low in nutrients. Examples of sugary drinks include: sodas, fruit juice drinks (not 100% fruit juice), sports drinks, sugar-sweetened teas and coffees, sugar-sweetened waters and energy drinks.

  • How much added sugar is acceptable for kids?
  • For a healthy diet, added sugar isn't necessary at all. In fact, the USDA and USHHS Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 say to reduce foods and drinks high in added sugars. "Sugar-sweetened beverages provide excess calories and few essential nutrients to the diet and should only be consumed when nutrient needs have been met and without exceeding daily calorie limits."
    The best way to determine how much added sugar is acceptable for your child's diet is to talk with their doctor or a registered dietitian. A doctor or registered dietitian can help you determine how many calories your child should be getting a day and how much added sugar is acceptable.
    U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2010). Dietary guidelines for Americans (7th ed.). Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, December 2010.
    http://www.cnpp.usda.gov/publications/dietaryguidelines/2010/policydoc/policydoc.pdf

  • How do sugary drinks increase my child's risk for tooth decay, obesity and diabetes?
  • How do sugary drinks increase my child's risks for tooth decay? According to the American Dental Association (ADA), sugar affects teeth when it mixes with plaque (a sticky film of bacteria).1 When sugar touches plaque it produces acid which then "attacks the teeth for 20 minutes or more" which can lead to tooth decay.1 ADA says "...when teeth come in frequent contact with soft drinks and other sugar-containing substances, the risk of (tooth) decay formation is increased."2 ADA recommends we be "mindful of the effects of frequent consumption of sugary beverages and non-nutritious snack foods."1 For more information, visit the American Dental Association's Web site: www.ada.org 1 American Dental Association. (2002). Diet and tooth decay. Journal of the American Dental Association, Vol. 133. 2 American Dental Association. (n.d.). Diet and oral health: Patient version. Retrieved from http://www.ada.org/2984.aspx

    How do sugary drinks increase my child's risks for obesity? Helping your child have a healthy weight and building healthy habits is essential for their future. Overweight teens have a 70 percent chance of becoming overweight or obese adults.1 A child's likelihood of becoming obese increases by 60 percent with each additional can or glass of sugary drinks they drink a day.2 Sugary drinks can lead to weight gain and obesity because they add calories to a child's diet. Those extra calories are added on top of the calories in the foods they eat. Just like adults, kids gain weight when they take in more calories than they use each day.
    1 Office of the Surgeon General. (2007). The Surgeon General's call to action to prevent and decrease overweight and obesity: Overweight children and adolescents. Last revised: January 11, 2007. Retrieved from http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/topics/obesity/calltoaction/fact_adolescents.htm
    2 Ludwig, DS., Peterson, KE., Gortmaker, SL. (2001). Relation between consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks and childhood obesity: A prospective, observational analysis. Lancet. 2001; 357(9255): 505-508.

    How do sugary drinks increase my child's risks for diabetes? Sugary drinks are the largest source of added sugars in the American diet.1 The reason sugary drinks increase the risk of type 2 diabetes is because they contribute to weight gain which can lead to obesity (an established risk factor for type 2 diabetes). One study found that participants who consumed large amounts of sugary drinks had a 26 percent higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those who consumed far fewer sugary drinks.2 1 Welsh, J.A., Sharma, A.J., Grellinger, L., Vos, M.B. (2011). Consumption of added sugars is decreasing in the United States. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 94, No. 3, pp. 726-734.
    2 Malik et al. (2010). Sugar-sweetened beverages and risk of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes: A meta-analysis. Diabetes Care, 33(11): 2477-83. Epub 2010, Aug. 6. Review.

  • What about 100% fruit juice?
  • Unlike sugary drinks, 100% fruit juices do have nutritional value. Many parents see them as a way to get their kids to eat fruit, but they are high in natural sugar. It's best to replace fruit juice with real fruit. Real fruit has fiber that is filling and missing from fruit juice. When serving 100% fruit juice: 1) Keep the portions small; 2) Take a look at the amount of sugar and calories they are getting; and 3) Instead of sugary drinks serve them water the rest of the day.

  • What about sports drinks and energy drinks?
  • Are sports drinks good for active kids? Sports drinks are sugary drinks. In most cases, water is the best choice for hydration. The American College of Sports Medicine found that there was no difference between consuming water and sports drinks during exercise lasting less than one hour.1 So, unless your child is at sports camp or competing in the summer heat, water is probably the best choice to keep them hydrated. Talk with your child's doctor or a registered dietitian if you have concerns. Carefully consider the amount of sugar in sports drinks before adding them to your child's diet. Keep cool water readily available for active kids at home and during activities.
    1 Convertino, V.A., Armstrong, L.E., Coyle, E.F., Mack, G. W., Sawka, M.N., Senay, L.C., Sherman, W.M. (1996). American College of Sports Medicine position stand on exercise and fluid replacement. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 28, No. 1, pp. i-vii. Retrieved from http://www.khsaa.org/sportsmedicine/heat/exerciseandfluidreplacement.pdf

    What about energy drinks? Most energy drinks have very high amounts of sugar and caffeine. Parents should carefully read the labels of these products and talk to a doctor or registered dietitian before giving energy drinks to their children.

  • How do I get my kids to enjoy drinking water?
  • Tips for Parents
    ·Be a water role model. We all know kids pick up habits from mom and dad. When your kids see you drinking water and healthy drinks they are more likely to drink them too! That means better health today and tomorrow.
    ·Serve water cold — it tastes better. Try refrigerating it or adding ice.
    ·Flavor water. Make the transition to more water by adding slices of fresh fruit or freezing 100% fruit juice into ice cubes and adding a cube to a glass of water
    ·Keep sugary drinks out of the fridge — and out of the house. What happens at home sets the tone for what happens everywhere else.
    ·Make a new habit of serving only water between meals.
    ·Make sugary drinks a treat like candy. Just one soda or juice drink can have as much sugar as two candy bars (on average, based on a 20 fl. oz. portion size). If you choose to give your kids a sugary drink make sure they understand it's a special treat and not something to expect daily.
    ·Keep portions small. If you choose to give your kids a sugary drink, control the portion size. Keep in mind that "small" isn't what it used to be. It's not uncommon for the "small" size fountain drink at fast food restaurants to be 20 fl. oz.
    ·Give your kids personal water bottles.They can carry them in the car and on the go.
    ·Transition gradually away from juice drinks by adding water to them.

  • What are the benefits of water?
  • Adapted from www.drinkwaterfirst.com
    The Benefits of Water
    ·Get Energized. Being even mildly dehydrated can sap your energy. If you're thirsty, you're already dehydrated - and this can lead to fatigue, muscle weakness, and dizziness.
    ·Healthy weight — Water is a great appetite suppressant. It makes you feel full so you're less likely to overeat. Often when we think we're hungry, we're actually just thirsty.
    ·Think Better. Staying hydrated is necessary for the human brain (which is 85 percent water) to function at its best. That's why some schools are starting to encourage students to keep a bottle of water at their desks.
    ·Smile. — Replacing sugary drinks with water will help prevent cavities. Cavity free check-ups will keep you and your child smiling.
    ·Get well. The advice to "drink plenty of fluids" when you're sick holds true. Water can help control a fever and replace lost fluids.
    ·Headache cure. Sometimes headaches come from not drinking enough water. There are lots of other causes of headaches, of course, but dehydration is a common one.
    ·Healthy skin. Drinking enough water is key to healthy skin.
    ·Play like a pro.Drinking plenty of water keeps you at the top of your game. Being dehydrated can greatly reduce athletic performance.
    ·Healthy for life. Studies show that drinking plenty of water reduces the risk of heart disease and cancer.
    ·Better digestion. Drinking enough water keeps the gastrointestinal system working at its best.
    Check out www.drinkwaterfirst.com

  • How can I find out more?
  • Obesity and childhood obesity information:
    Surgeon General's call to action to prevent and decrease overweight and obesity. http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/topics/obesity/calltoaction/fact_adolescents.htm
    National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases - Overweight and Obesity Statistics
    http://win.niddk.nih.gov/statistics/

    ·General Nutrition Information
    USDA and USDHHS - Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010
    http://www.cnpp.usda.gov/publications/dietaryguidelines/2010/policydoc/policydoc.pdf
    FDA Nutrition Label Tutorial
    http://www.fda.gov/food/labelingnutrition/consumerinformation/ucm078889.htm

    ·Sugary Drinks and Health Information:
    CDC Rethink Your Drink
    http://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/healthy_eating/drinks.html
    AHA Frequently Asked Questions About Sugar
    http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/GettingHealthy/NutritionCenter/HealthyDietGoals/Frequently-Asked-Questions-About-Sugar_UCM_306725_Article.jsp
    Article: Carbonated Soft Drinks and Dental Caries in the Primary Dentition
    http://jdr.sagepub.com/content/85/3/262.full.pdf+html

    ·Sugary Drinks and Diabetes Information:
    Article: Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Risk of Metabolic Syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes
    http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/33/11/2477.full.pdf+html
    Article: Women and weight, type 2 diabetes JAMA
    http://jama.ama-assn.org/content/292/8/927.full.pdf+html

    ·Sugary Drinks and Teeth:
    American Dental Association - Diet and Oral Health
    http://www.ada.org/2984.aspx
    Article: Carbonated Soft Drinks and Dental Caries in the Primary Dentition
    http://jdr.sagepub.com/content/85/3/262.full.pdf+html
    Article: Dental Caries and Beverage Consumption in Young Children
    http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/112/3/e184.full.pdf+html

    ·Water Information:
    Drink Water First.com
    www.drinkwaterfirst.com

    * Web site addresses of non-federal organizations are provided solely as a service to readers. Provision of an address does not constitute endorsement of this organization by KDHE or the state government, and none should be inferred. KDHE is not responsible for the content of other organizations' web pages.

Your kids are already sweet. Don't add sugar. Just Add Water